Happiness At Work #71 ~ “How’s Life?” (a question that matters to us all)

photo credit: FerociousPrecocious via photopin cc

photo credit: FerociousPrecocious via photopin cc

The title of this week;’s post comes from the rhetorical question posed by the new OECD How’s Life? 2013 report.  This is one of several reports and articles we have noticed this week that bring us temperature readings about the quality of life and living in the last weeks of 2013.

And sadly, this means this week’s post has a lot more about unhappiness than its title suggests.

See how some of these findings compare with your own experience…

photo credit: Annie Mole via photopin cc

photo credit: Annie Mole via photopin cc

The How’s Life? 2013 report  focuses in particular on our state of wellbeing at – and as a result of – work:

How’s Life? 2013 – Focusing on people

“How’s Life?”  It’s a question that matters to us all…

Martine Durand, OECD Chief Statistician writes in her summary of the new How’s Life? 2013 report

Well-being in the workplace: The importance of quality jobs

For many years, the focus of policy has mainly been on providing job opportunities and ensuring that people who wanted to work could find a job. However, most people spend a large part of their lives working and what happens in the workplace is an essential determinant of overall well-being.

Having a good or quality job does not just mean receiving good salaries or having dynamic careers; it also means working in an environment that is conducive to personal accomplishment and where people are committed. People’s engagement and high sense of well-being at work depend a lot on whether they have autonomy in their job and are given well-defined work objectives. Respectful and supportive management practices and support from colleagues are also important.  

When jobs and workplaces combine these factors, people are more apt to manage work pressure and emotionally demanding jobs, and they also tend to be healthier and more productive.

Focusing on what matters to people, and improving existing metrics or developing new ones to measure well-being and progress, is the way ahead to achieve better lives, today and tomorrow.

Link to read original article in full

photo credit: Ed Yourdon via photopin cc

photo credit: Ed Yourdon via photopin cc

Closer to home, in the UK the latest intelligence from the Office of National Statistics (ONS) new wellbeing statistics gathering also shows a de-emphasis on money as the root of all happiness:

New national wellbeing statistics show money doesn’t always equal happiness

Our obsession with maximising of economic growth overlooks the importance of people’s happiness and wellbeing as a measurement of the UK’s success

Nic Marks, director of Happiness Works and founder of the award-winning Centre for Wellbeing at the think tank nef (the New Economics Foundation), writes in The Guardian…

The gathering  of wellbeing data allows us to challenge orthodoxies and assumptions. In London, which consistently ranks as the wealthiest area of the UK, 30 out of 34 boroughs are below the UK average for wellbeing. While in Northern Ireland, the third poorest area, 24 out of 26 districts exceed the national average. This new wellbeing data clearly reveals that economic measures of welfare are insufficient to fully capture people’s experience of their lives. This is not to say that material living standards don’t matter – they clearly do. But these new measures offer data that is highly relevant to policy makers…

It’s very strange that many political commentators have criticised the “happiness agenda” as being individualistic. This couldn’t be further from the truth.

We are relational beings, born through a relationship, brought up in a network of relationships and living out our lives in relationships. It should come as no surprise that the quality of our personal relationships has a great impact on our happiness. Local policy makers should begin to question how they can encourage people to make more and better connections.

What could they do to break down the barriers that stop people interacting? How can they design local spaces so that people meet – both intentionally and accidentally? …

Ultimately, a national and local focus on wellbeing allows for a reimagining of how life can be in 21st century Britain. Are we going to continue with our obsessive maximisation of economic growth? Or can we instead think about how to make better places to live, to work and to bring up children? We know that we face huge social and environmental challenges, and we also know that they are not going to be solved through a business-as-usual approach. If people’s happiness and well-being is to be made “the central political challenge of our times” then the new evidence base being built on data like that produced by the ONS is to be welcomed wholeheartedly.

Link to read the original article in full

Is Britain the Most Tired Nation in Europe?

In the net blog, SAAMAH ABDALLAH writes…

When questioned in a recent survey, 1 in 2 people in the UK said that, more often than not, they did not feel fresh and rested when they woke up in the morning.

It needn’t be like this. Elsewhere across Europe – in Germany, Spain, Austria and Italy, for example – it’s only about 1 in 4 people who feel this tired in the morning. In fact, out of the 27 countries in the EU at the time of the survey, the UK ranks worst on this question…

As well as feeling tired, people in the UK are also the least likely in the EU to feel active and vigorous, and the least likely to feel close to people in their local area. For example, 22% of people in the UK did not feel close to people in their local area, compared to just 11% in the Netherlands and 8% in Spain. Surely we deserve better than this? Where is the UK going wrong? …

We can speculate on some of the potential reasons – high numbers of people working very long hours, more time spent on sedentary activities such as watching TV or in front of computers, low levels of physical activity, high rates of depression, or just bad weather. We know that all of these factors are associated with lower levels of vitality, but on their own, none of them explain why the UK comes absolute bottom in terms of this aspect of well-being.

Identifying the key factors that are relevant here would help government develop policies that would allow the public to lead more energetic lives. Surely it’s in the UK’s best interests to have a workforce that’s able to get up in the morning?

Link to read the original article in full

photo credit: istolethetv via photopin cc

photo credit: istolethetv via photopin cc

Get It Done Day: The Daily Grind: Break the Mould

Released today, our research report – The Daily Grind: Break the Mould – reveals a process-driven “inbox zero” culture is killing innovation in British companies and demotivating workers. It’s clear we need to change the way we work – and fast.

Key research findings: too many meetings, too much information, too little innovation

  • Over half (54%) of workers surveyed have slogged away at the weekend just to keep up, and only 8% feel they have made a major contribution to their employer in the past year.
  • Only one in seven (16%) office workers are inspired by their job
  • UK office workers potentially doing around two billion hours of unpaid overtime at the weekend every year
  • Nearly a quarter (23%) say they have never made a major contribution to their employer
  • Four in ten (41%) say they are not empowered by their organisation to think differently
  • 39% say their organisation needs to rethink how it operates

So, what’s the way forward?

We asked Doug Shaw of What Goes Around Limited “Why do so many workers feel they have no power to think differently about their workplace? How can this be addressed?”

“Most work is coercive.  It is done to you.  The best work is coactive.  It is done with you.  IT is totally human to want, need and expect that our views be taken into consideration, and yet we defy these wants, needs and expectations at almost every step of our working lives.

Never do anything about me without me.  Put simply, as Stephen Covey wrote, ‘We need to listen with the intent to understand, not the intent to reply.’  I think that means we need to bring love and artistry into work.”

We caught up with Barry Furby  of Synthesio to discuss this question: “Why do so many workers feel they have no power to think differently about their workplace? How can this be addressed?”

“Many businesses now reward innovation and entrepreneurialism in the workplace.  I think workers should continue to push this message in everything they do.  Ultimately if it really is impossible in your organisation someone else will reward you well for it elsewhere.

“‘Innovate or die’ is an over used phrase but it’s a fact of our era.”

We caught up with Business Psychologist Tony Crabbe to get his perspective on the modern office.

“Organisations kill creativity; brilliantly.  They fill every ounce of attention with frenetic activity and the white noise of organisational uber-communication.

“They reward hard work over thought; encourage speed of response over intellectual ambling, and value (false) certainty over intelligent doubt.  They create busy drones battered into the submission of groupthink.”

The Telegraph has marked Get It Done Day with an article on Britain’s population of workaholics. Too many of us are working unpaid overtime and this extra work isn’t getting us anywhere.

Britain is a nation of workaholics with 54% of workers admitting they put in unpaid overtime at the weekend

Meanwhile, Information Age has also been examining the findings from the Break the Mould report.

UK office workers are so focused on managing email traffic and attending internal meetings, they struggle to find time to produce anything really meaningful

Too many meetings, too little innovation. How would you re-imagine business?

Link to read the full article and graphics in its original format

photo credit: Nrbelex via photopin cc

photo credit: Nrbelex via photopin cc

How Much Are We Willing To Pay For The Pursuit Of Happiness?

By Michael Hiltzik

Never mind the conventional speculation about whether the resolution of some political standoff favours liberals or conservatives…

The more fundamental question, says Benjamin Radcliff, is this: Does it make people happier or not?

Radcliff is a political scientist at Notre Dame whose work places him in the forefront of what might be labeled happiness studies. His particular corner of the field looks at social policies and political outcomes. It’s an ambitious study, as is shown by the title of his book, published this year: “The Political Economy of Human Happiness: How Voters’ Choices Determine the Quality of Life.”

Radcliff’s research suggests that higher levels of social programs produce a happier population and that public policies such as social insurance and strong labor market protections are among the most important factors.

“The differences in your feeling of well-being living in a Scandinavian country (where welfare programs are large) versus the U.S. are going to be larger than the individual factors in your life,” he says. “The political differences trump all the individual things you’re supposed to do to make yourself happier — to have fulfilling personal relationships, to have a job, to have more income. All those individual factors get swamped by the political factors. Countries with high levels of gross domestic product consumed by government have higher levels of personal satisfaction.”

Or as Radcliff put it in a CNN op-ed: “The ‘nanny state’ works.”

Statistics bear him out. In the 2013 World Happiness Report,published by the UN and compiled by Jeffrey D. Sachs of Columbia University and colleagues from the London School of Economics and the University of British Columbia, four of the top five rankings are occupied by Denmark, Norway, Switzerland, the Netherlands and Sweden, all countries with strong social programs…

Link to read the original article in full (based on U.S. politics)

NOT YET USED

photo credit: jouste via photopin cc

Gross Village Happiness

, Founder, SEEKHO. reports of a successful village programme…

SEEKHO is built on the principle of Gross Village Happiness (GVH). GVH is a new model and policy for empowering people in rural communities with the tools needed to increase and improve the five elements of wellbeing known as PERMA, as coined by Positive Psychology founder Martin Seligman: positive emotion, engagement, relationships, meaning and accomplishment…

During the past year, the children have become more versatile learners. Similarly, my own growth during this period has been tremendous, as the children have taught me how to better practice listening, empathy and resilience. A large part of the reason why we have been able to grow together has been SEEKHO’s focus on wellbeing, which has created an ecosystem of positive behavior and reinforcement. This experience has shown me that not only can wellbeing be increased when we give communities a voice in the process, but also that it is necessary for policy if we want to empower villages to thrive.

The shift to Gross Village Happiness will require experimentation and a keen sensitivity to the local context in order to empower the next generation of children in rural India. It is time to expand our definition of success and wellbeing so that children feel empowered to not only to draw and paint artwork, but also their own dreams…

Link to read the original article in full

photo credit: ben matthews ::: via photopin cc

photo credit: ben matthews ::: via photopin cc

From ego-system to eco-system economies

Otto Scharmer writes about…

…- “co-sensing,” or going to places that allow us to see the system from the edges – if listened to with one’s mind and heart wide open, they hold the golden keys to the future;

– “co-inspiring,” or creating channels for connecting to the sources of creativity;

– “prototyping,” or exploring the future by doing things in the present in very different ways; and

– “co-shaping” the spaces in which these prototypes can be embodied and scaled-up.

Of these various infrastructures, those for co-sensing and co-inspiring are particularly underdeveloped in society today.  Trying to advance societal innovation through prototyping and scaling-up alone is like building a house without foundations.  That’s why so many current efforts fail, because they ignore the deeper conditions of the social field (the mindsets, attitudes and intentions), and focus only on the superstructure of incentives and institutions. Without a fundamental shift in consciousness it will be impossible to sustain an eco-centered economy.

A profound renewal of this kind at the personal, societal and global levels is crucial for our planetary future.  What’s needed to underpin these renewals are change-makers who are willing to lead from the emerging future: leaders who are willing to open up to, learn about and practice the journey from ego-system to eco-system thinking. We already have much of what we need to hand in the form of living examples, tools and frameworks. What’s missing is the co-creative vision and the common will to make this revolution a reality.

Link to read the original article in full

photo credit: dModer101 via photopin cc

photo credit: dModer101 via photopin cc

Is Creativity Arts Policy’s Big Mistake?

Creative workers are seen as paid hobbyists rather than as professionals with valuable labour power, writes Dave O’Brien, a lecturer in cultural and creative industries at City University, London and author of Cultural Policy: Management, Value and Modernity in the Creative Industries ...

It is creativity that has enabled cultural policy to branch out into areas beyond the arts, such as economic, social and health policy. Equally, creativity is seen as a capacity or personal quality that everybody possesses, a quality that we all carry around with us to be liberated or developed at will. And to do so will somehow free us to enjoy a work utopia that is not about the factory, but rather about self-expression.

What is creativity’s actual role in contemporary British life? …

What a privileged and joyful position to be paid to do what you want to do anyway. However, being paid for your hobby renders questions of class, wealth and power, as well as those about gender relations and the representation of ethnicities, impossible to ask and answer. These questions are buried in the working conditions of job insecurity, long hours and low pay that shape the deskilled and deprofessionalised ‘hybrid’ job.

In this vision of work, everybody who is working is a talented individual, expressing their creativity and therefore getting no less or more than they deserve. The cultural theorist Angela McRobbie argues that the narrative of “doing what you love” polarises our understanding of success and failure with perverse consequences for individuals and the rest of the economy. Not being involved in work you love, not expressing your identity, not being committed to the point of potentially damaging yourself, becomes associated with failure – both in artistic terms and in terms of your talent and sense of self.

Link to read the original article in full

photo credit: jenny downing via photopin cc

photo credit: jenny downing via photopin cc

Stress in the Workplace – Who Takes Responsibility?

Paul Barrett, Head of Wellbeing, Bank Workers Charity writes…

This article has been written to tie in with National Stress Awareness Day (NSAD) on November 6th. This year will be the 15th annual NSAD.

The recent CIPD Absence Management report revealed that stress is on the increase. This is despite the fact that more organisations than ever are investing in comprehensive employee wellbeing strategies. These are designed to build the resilience of their workforce and to offer support to those suffering from stress. There is every reason to believe such strategies are making a difference but they may not be enough. Why should this be?

A tough world out there.

It needs to be recognised that at this moment in time, there is a coming together of factors, economic and social, that conspire to make employees’ personal and work boundaries more difficult to negotiate than ever…

Our own research into the banking sector revealed that non- work demands form a major source of stress for people in work, yet at present these are not being well addressed. Many employees struggling with debt or in the throes of a divorce find it difficult to access support. As austerity bites many of the support agencies in the community that employees traditionally turn to are finding their resources stretched to the limit as they seek to respond to rising demand with reduced funding. With all of this going on, it’s no surprise that stress levels are high…so why aren’t traditional approaches to stress enough?

The way forward – there is no silver bullet

The complex interplay between personal and workplace demands means that any strategy that seeks to prevent or ameliorate employee stress needs to come from a number of directions and historic approaches to stress may not serve us well.

In the 1980s many organisations offered stress management courses to employees to help them cope when it all became too much. These courses contained sound information,  were frequently popular with participants but they  implicitly devolved responsibility for managing stress onto the employee. More recently the focus has shifted towards the employer’s duty of care and businesses have taken steps to address the organisational factors that contribute to employee stress…

Forward thinking employers have already begun to introduce interventions that affect the organisational culture in positive ways, creating an environment that reduces  workplace stress. Such preventative approaches include training for managers in promoting behaviours that support employee wellbeing, whilst discouraging  those that increase pressure on employees. These can make a big difference to the stress levels in the workplace. They also go a long way  to creating an organisational climate in which employees feel able to raise concerns and  seek help when they’re struggling,  so that problems from home or work don’t spiral out of control.

As many sources of stress originate not at work but in employees’ personal lives they need to recognise their own part in reducing the impact of stress.  They too have a responsibility for building up their internal resources so they are equipped to deal with the inevitable stresses they encounter in their daily lives. People with high levels of personal resilience are much more likely to recover well from high stress life events such as bereavement, relationship breakdown or redundancy.

But personal resilience needs to be worked at. Employees need to take care of themselves, ensuring their work-life balance is not out of kilter. They need to make sure that they get enough sleep, that they take regular exercise and that they eat healthily. They also need to accommodate enough of the life-enhancing leisure activities that will restore optimism, vitality and peace of mind. Bolstered by these actions employees will enjoy a more rewarding life both at home and at work and will bounce back more quickly  from setbacks they experience in either sphere.

What we are seeing is the need for a holistic, almost systemic approach to stress that recognises the complex interactions between the home and working lives of employees. It is one that appreciates that responsibility for addressing stress at work resides exclusively with neither employer nor employee.  Creating a healthy workforce requires both parties to play their part.

Link to read the original article in full

photo credit: TheeErin via photopin cc

photo credit: TheeErin via photopin cc

Over-extended? 6 Signs You Need A Break

by TINA WILLIAMSON

“To overextend yourself is to invite defeat.” – G. William Domhoff

We all know the feeling, we have too much to do and too little time, and soon we begin to feel like a piñata at our six year olds birthday party, battered and flung in every direction.

Ask yourself these questions:

  1. Do you spend time worrying about time?   
  2. Do you eat on the go?  Lunch on your lap in the car? …
  3. Do you get enough sleep?  …
  4. Do you make time for your friends, family or hobbies?  
  5. Do you make time for your health, via exercise and healthy eating? 
  6. Can you handle change?   

The problem with overextending ourselves this way is that one little shift is like a jenga puzzle; it’s all going to come crashing down.

You need to hear this – if you’re being flung in every direction, then you’re not really following through on anything or doing anything particularly great…

If any of this sounds like you, then you need to make some changes.

1. Start with outer changes…

2.  Learn how to say No – be assertive…

3.  Put you first…

4.  Meditate…

5.  Practice Mindfulness…

6.  Laugh…

7.  Write it out…

8.  Ignore Expectations…

9.  Remember you’re not Perfect…

10.  Focus on one task at a time…

Take time to:

  • breathe
  • meditate
  • read
  • contemplate
  • relax
  • think
  • laugh
  • dream
  • do something that will make YOU feel happy!

Link to read the original article with Tina’s advice in full

photo credit: byronv2 via photopin cc

photo credit: byronv2 via photopin cc

The Female Breadwinner’s Survival Guide by Jennie Garrett

*Struggling to balance a budding entrepreneurial business with being Mom?

*Torn between family commitments and work?

*Thrust into the role of breadwinner when your partner has been laid off, retired or become ill?

*Non-existent work life balance?

You are not alone, around 40% of women in the US are the breadwinner, and the number is growing. There’s been a lot of talk about the ‘End of Men’ and women being ‘The Richer Sex’, but it’s not all power suits and top jobs.  

Rhonda, a successful businesswoman, working in a male dominated environment, with a child under one year old sums up the challenge of being the breadwinner eloquently:  “By being a working career woman or career mom, I’m trying to get the best out of both worlds. I’m trying to be true to who I am, not to who other people want me to be or what people think people I should be. And that is difficult”  

Jenny Garrett, executive coach and author of Rocking Your Role, the ‘how to’ guide to success for female breadwinners, shares 10 essential survival tips from her experience of coaching hundreds of female breadwinners.

1. Check Your Ego…

2. Drop the Superwoman Syndrome

3. Remember you always have a choice…

4. Talk about money…

5. Look after your spiritual, physical and mental well-being…

6. Ditch the Guilt
…

7. Recognise your interdependence …

8. Maintain your femininity…

9. Celebrate and share with other woman…

10. Be aware of the legacy that you are leaving…

Link to read Jennie Garretts’s guidance in full

photo credit: ocean.flynn via photopin cc

photo credit: ocean.flynn via photopin cc

Six Good Reasons To Create A Compassionate Workplace

, journalist focusing on empathy and compassion, writes…

A recent Gallup poll revealed that just 13% of the world’s employees are engaged at work. About a quarter are ‘actively disengaged’ – unhappy, unproductive and liable to spread negativity to their colleagues. These statistics were fresh in my mind when I took part in a conference in London to explore the benefits of creating a culture of compassion at work…

Before you start picturing boardroom sing-alongs and group hugs around the water cooler, let’s define a compassionate workplace as follows: a work environment where people feel valued and supported, and are encouraged to develop their skills and reach their full potential.

Here are six things I learned about why this matters:

1. Stress is bad for business

Work-related stress cost the UK economy an estimated £6.5bn last year. In the United States, the cost was around $300bn. …When bosses are aggressive or demand the impossible, employees compete rather than collaborate, and we fear failure rather than being motivated to succeed, employers pay the price with more sick days, lower productivity and high turnover rates.

2. Compassion boosts the bottom line

Keeping employees happy is not just an irritating distraction from the serious business of making money. Richard Barrett, a leadership consultant who advocates a values-driven approach in organisations, looked at Fortune magazine’s annual list of the 100 Best Companies to Work For. Over a ten-year period to July 2012, he tracked the share price growth of the top 40 publicly traded companies on the list. They showed average annualised returns of 16.4%, compared to 4.1% for the S&P 500 index – and they bounced back quicker from the 2008 global economic meltdown.

It’s not always about profits, of course. In workplaces where care and compassion are (or should be) the primary focus, like hospitals, nursing homes and schools, a supportive environment is just as beneficial.

3. Givers come out on top

Adam Grant, the highest-rated professor at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, has been studying workplace interactions for over a decade. He identifies three types of colleagues: ‘givers‘, who enjoy helping others and do so with no strings attached; ‘matchers‘, who give but ask for something in return; and ‘takers‘, who want as much as possible and never give anything back.

According to Grant, the highest proportion of those who make it to the top are givers. Although there are also more givers at the bottom, the givers who make it, make it big. The secret of their success is to be compassionate without losing sight of their own objectives, and without allowing their time and goodwill to be exploited by the takers.

4. Compassion makes us happier and healthier

Scientific research shows that kindness and compassion have a surprising range of benefits. For example, doing something good for others is like eating a piece of chocolate – it activates the ‘pleasure centres’ in our brain. One study even found that we get the same kind of buzz when we see someone else giving to charity as when we receive money ourselves.

People who lead a life of greater compassion, meaning and purpose seem to enjoy lower levels of inflammation at the cellular level, and a compassion or service-based lifestyle also seems to act as a buffer against the effects of stress.

5. Kindness is contagious

When we see people doing something good for others, we’re inspired to emulate them. In one study involving a ‘public-goods game’ where people had the opportunity to cooperate with each other, when one person gave money to help others, the recipients were more likely to give away their own money in future games. This created a ripple effect that had an impact three degrees of separation away from the original act of kindness.

As the psychologist and author Daniel Goleman points out, we have ‘mirror neurons’ in our brain that “make emotions contagious”, so every interaction counts.

6. Everyone wins

Emma Seppala, a compassion and altruism researcher at Stanford University who has advised companies like Google, Facebook and Hallmark, says: “Organisations that are more compassionate and happier, healthier places to work have employees with lower heart rate and blood pressure, and stronger immunity. Compassionate and pro-social employees build better relationships with each other, their productivity is better and they create a better atmosphere. As a consequence those organisations see lower employee turnover and increased customer service, as well as increased loyalty, which at the end of the day is what they are looking for.”

Link to read the original article in full

photo credit: Nanagyei via photopin cc

photo credit: Nanagyei via photopin cc

Happiness At Work Edition #71

These articles – and many more – are all part of the new Happiness At Work Edition #71

We hope you find things here to use, enjoy and enliven your life and get a a bit closer to the life you ideally want to be living.

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